You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Future Of The Left’ category.

I’m by no means an experienced festival-goer. Despite having soiled with saliva the Reading & Glastonbury ad pages of my late 80s Melody Makers & NMEs, by the time I was in close enough proximity to attend one of those ‘holy grail’ festivals the line-ups didn’t hold enough interest to warrant spending three days in an increasing state of mud bespatterment. For me it has to be first & foremost about the music, maannn – I view as alien those who attend these events just for the ‘vibe’, wandering around dazed & confused, missing all the performances in lieu of some altered state of camaraderie. So when the deserving-of-huge-reward-in-the-afterlife Barry Hogan and Helen Cottage launched the inaugural All Tomorrow’s Parties festival in 2000, it was a dream come true – one of my favourite bands (Mogwai) choosing all of their favourite bands (amongst whom Shellac, Papa M, Wire, Sonic Youth, The For Carnation, Bardo Pond) to play in a seaside holiday camp where the punters had a proper roof over their heads, a plumbed-in toilet and self-catering facilities. That April weekend was one of the best of my life thus far, and subsequent ATP experiences (Shellac 2002, The Director’s Cut 2004, Slint 2005, Dirty Three 2007) similarly served up never-to-be-forgotten idyll on the English coast.

That the fine folks of ATP have over the years achieved the seemingly impossible by tempting out of retirement Slint, Television, My Bloody Valentine and now the Jesus Lizard, only adds to their legend, and to my mind you can’t have much better endorsement than that of the notoriously promoter-skeptical & festival-avoiding Steve Albini, who said “There are three things in the world that I endorse: Abbey Road Studios, Nutter Butter Sandwich Cookies and All Tomorrow’s Parties” (a somewhat healthier endorsement than that which appeared in the liner notes of Big Black’s “Songs About Fucking“: “Steve uses and endorses heroin”). Albini’s band Shellac are such regular ATP’ers that they’re now officially the “ATP house band”.


ATP flashback 01

from top, l-r: Mogwai (2005), Shellac (2004), Matmos (2005), Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy (2002), carousel horses (2007), Joanna Newsom (2007), Envy (2004)


On the return journeys after those wonderful weekends there have always been daydream conversations about “if you were curating ATP…”.

In 2007 the organizers gave form to those daydreams, introducing the concept of “ATP vs the Fans“, where the ATP folk chose half the line-up and ticket holders collectively got to select the rest (via a voting system). That concept has been resurrected for one of the May weekends in 2009, this time with the stipulation that votes can only be cast for bands that have not previously played an ATP festival in the UK. After purchasing tickets, attendees each get to submit a wishlist of 10 acts – these votes are tallied into a master list and every two weeks the top 2 names on that list are approached to play the festival (should the top 2 prove unavailable then the next 2 are approached). Of course it is unreasonable to expect people to splash the cash without some initial enticement, and the organisers more than held up their end by announcing a (to me) mindblowing first few names for their portion of the bill: the reformation of the Jesus Lizard!!! the reformation of Sleep!!! Anti-Pop Consortium!!! Grails!!!

On the basis of those four alone this became a must-attend event for me, and tickets have duly been procured and votes cast. Excluding bands that have previously played these awesome festivals was a tough assignment, as so many of my favourites have already appeared, but in the end the difficulty was reducing the list down to just ten.


ATP flashback 02

from top, l-r: Ganger (2000), Slint (2005), Camber Sands (2002), Múm (2005), Zeni Geva (2002), Dirty Three (2007), Camber Sands (2005), Boredoms (2004), Low (2002)


So now the wait in hope that I’m not too far out of step with the other attendees, and that at least some of my choices end up playing.  So far no good, with only two of those choices – Future Of The Left and Jesu – scoring high enough to be proffered an invite (which FotL have duly accepted, still waiting on Mr JK Flesh). Of the current list of 100,  only a handful of my choices are languishing in the lower reaches of the chart, so it seems I’ll have to rely on a ‘wildcard pick’ to see any more of my wishlist tread the Butlins boards in early May, but there is still plenty of time to go so I remain hopeful. None-the-less, with recent confirmations from Electric Wizard, Alan Sparhawk’s Retribution Gospel Choir and Qui, offers out to Neurosis, Killing Joke, Wolves In The Throneroom, Harvey Milk and Casiotone For The Painfully Alone, and faith in the further choices of the ATP curators, the line-up for “ATP: The Fans Strike Back” promises to be an awesome one and I’m already gleefully rubbing body parts in anticipation of my May trip to the wilds of Minehead!


On the Mixtapes page you’ll find a companion-compilation to the 2007 ATP which was curated by Dirty Three.

 

My votes went to :
Alasdair Roberts
Boduf Songs
Epic45
Future Of The Left
Jesu
Killdozer
Nadja
Scout Niblett
These New Puritans
The Young Gods

The votes of my unmarried female companion :
Aesop Rock
Alasdair Roberts
Boduf Songs
Epic45
Jesu
Killdozer
Nadja
Scout Niblett
Tunng
Whip / Timesbold

Pretty much the only thing I feared I’d be giving up on leaving London was the Big Smoke’s rich & varied live music scene. Sure, I still cast the occasional envious glance at The Luminaire‘s programme of The Young Gods acoustic sets, Jason Molina Christmas parties and Stars Of The Lid supported by Boduf Songs (and reminisce how that great little venue was but a stone’s throw from my former lair), but my time in Holland so far has been packed full of excellent gigs. The beauty of this small country is that distances between cities are such that it is possible to go and see a show in a different city in the same travel time as it would take to get from one side of London to another – so I’ve already seen things in Amsterdam, Den Haag, Utrecht and Haarlem, and that list is only likely to grow (hopefully taking in Groningen’s Vera one of these days, which has a reputation as one of the best places to play anywhere in Europe). And the smaller hall upstairs at Paradiso, located in an old church but a space that can rock hard, has fast become one of my favourite venues.

So in another attempt at getting this site back up to speed, here is a (mainly visual) rundown of some of the great live experiences I’ve had in this country so far…


Six Organs Of Admittance @ Paradiso (bovenzaal), Amsterdam (14-Aug-2007)

I’ve written here about my first proper live experience in my new home, this highly-charged ritual of amplifier worship definitely one of my favourite shows of last year.


Future Of The Left @ Tivoli De Helling, Utrecht (04-Oct-2007)

Future Of The Left @ Tivoli De Helling, Utrecht

The maiden out-of-town gig, to catch Future Of The Left on their first foray to continental Europe. Their energetically vicious stabs of sound and low-end punch quickly won over the crowd, many of whom were presumably encountering the band for the first time (FotL were supporting American punkrockers Against Me!)


Michael Gira @ Paradiso (bovenzaal), Amsterdam (15-Oct-2007)

Michael Gira @ Paradiso, Amsterdam

That this show did not make my top gigs of ’07 list is criminal oversight. Michael Gira is a living legend, and every performance of his that I have witnessed has been a special experience, none more so than this one. He invests his performances with genuine passion, his hollerin’ & boot-stampin’ making it seem as though he’s channeling a sold-his-soul bluesman playing in 1920’s dusty nowheresville. The set opens with Swans-song “I Am The Sun” and follows with a perfect mix of material covering further late-period Swans releases and all of Angels Of Light‘s oeuvre. Gira wrly remarks that he wishes to “write spiritual songs, but I don’t have any”, but don’t worry Michael: as I’m sure the rest of this night’s audience would agree, despite the bleak and sometime hopeless nature of the subject matter, your performances reach right into one’s emotional core and are genuinely life-affirming.

Setlist: Michael Gira @ Paradiso (15 October 2007)
I Am The Sun
Promise Of Water
Nations
Failure
Lena’s Song
My Brother’s Man
She Lives!
Destroyer
My Sister Said
Sometimes I Dream I’m Hurting You
Rose Of Los Angeles
God Damn The Sun

Here is the encore “God Damn The Sun”, recorded live in Lisbon, Portugal in 2002 and taken from the (now out-of-print) “Living ’02” release.

Michael Gira – God Damn The Sun (live in Lisbon)



Liars @ Melkweg, Amsterdam (30-Oct-2007)

Liars @ Melkweg, Amsterdam

My first experience of this legendary venue, and what an experience it was.  Angus Andrew seemed to be enjoying Amsterdam to its mind-altering fullest and was in fine showman form, he and his cohorts putting on a sensory assault of rhythmic noise and lights that overwhelmed some in the audience but delighted most (at their best Liars manage to channel the Cure, Bauhaus, Neubauten, and the Birthday Party, giving it all a post-modern/art-school twist, their live shows somewhere between pagan ritual and post-millennial dance party). The newest songs were blasted out fully-formed, unlike my first exposure to them months previously – and the trancey tribalism of the amazing “We Fenced Our Houses…” and “Let’s Not Wrestle Mt. Heart Attack” had the audience riveted in near-religious awe.


Mono + Future Of The Left @ Patronaat, Haarlem (09-Nov-2007)

Future Of The Left @ Patronaat, Haarlem

Following another blistering bass-heavy set from FotL (albeit with the band themselves not seeming to enjoy themselves, unhappy with the Haarlemmers engagement & their own equipment troubles), I didn’t actually see headliners Mono, instead listening to their bombastic but sterile ‘compositions’ from the merch stand while politely grilling FotL’s Falco for Albini tidbits & the like…


Gravenhurst @ Paradiso (bovenzaal), Amsterdam (20-Nov-2007)

Gravenhurst @ Paradiso, Amsterdam

Nick Talbot’s Nick Drake-isms sometimes sit incongruously with the (post)rockier tack he has taken on Gravenhurst‘s past two albums. The best songs this night (like “Down River”, “The Western Lands” and “Black Holes In The Sand”) are when he pulls back on the earnest and the band collectively let their hair down.



Part II to follow shortly with futher uninformative blatherings on Jason Molina, Qui, Jesu, the State-X / New Forms festival, Aesop Rock and Whip…



Having once been a relatively enthusiastic proponent of the end-of-year ‘best of’ list, a few years ago I stopped putting these together in favour of just creating an aural review of releases I particularly liked in the form of a CD compilation. I suppose I rejected the idea of trying to rank the year’s releases, to come up with the ‘best album’ of that particular year, as this was forcing me to evaluate the music on a critical/intellectual level that doesn’t work for me – for me music is about feeling; from wanting to bang my head or creep myself out, from getting goosebumps of euphoria to twinges of melancholy… But I suppose it is sacrilege for a music-related blog to come to the end of a year and not attempt some sort of round-up, so rather than create a ranked list justified by socio-political contexts or clever meta-musical references, these are the records (in no particular order) and live performances that have rocked / droned / folked up / brokebeat / hiphopped my world in 2007, that have made me feel



Top 25 Albums of 2007


NarcoAgent Top 25 Albums of 2007

from top, l-r:

Magnolia Electric Co : “Sojourner” boxset (Secretly Canadian)

PJ Harvey : “White Chalk” (Island)

Angels Of Light : “We Are Him” (Young God)

Low : “Drums And Guns” (Sub Pop)

Liars : “Liars” (Mute)

Mammal : “Lonesome Drifter” (Animal Disguise)

Grinderman : “Grinderman” (Mute)

Boris with Michio Kurihara : “Rainbow” (Pedal/Drag City)

El-P : “I’ll Sleep When You’re Dead” (Definitive Jux)

Vic Chesnutt : “North Star Deserter” (Constellation)

Nina Nastasia & Jim White : “You Follow Me” (Fat Cat)

Om : “Pilgrimage” (Southern Lord)

Scout Niblett : “This Fool Can Die Now” (Too Pure)

Shellac : “Excellent Italian Greyhound” (Touch & Go)

Epic45 : “May Your Heart Be The Map” (Make Mine Music)

Magik Markers : “Boss” (Ecstatic Peace!)

MIA : “Kala” (XL)

Sigur Rós : “Hvarf-Heim” (EMI)

Stars Of The Lid : “And The Refinement Of Their Decline” (Kranky)

Jesu : “Conqueror” (HydraHead/Daymare)

Alela Diane : “The Pirate’s Gospel” (Holocene/Names/Fargo)

Six Organs Of Admittance : “Shelter From The Ash” (Drag City)

Bracken : “We Know About The Need” (Anticon)

Future Of The Left : “Curses” (Too Pure)

Earth : “Hibernaculum” (Southern Lord)




Top 5 EPs/Singles of 2007


NarcoAgent Top 5 EPs of 2007

l-r:

Efterklang : “Under Giant Trees” (Leaf)

Zonderhoof : “Zonderhoof” EP (Sound Devastation)

Joanna Newsom : “Joanna Newsom & The Ys Street Band” EP (Drag City)

Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy : “Ask Forgiveness” EP (Drag City/Domino)

Jesu : “Sundown / Sunrise” EP (Aurora Borealis/Daymare)

 



Top 10 Gigs of 2007


NarcoAgent Top 10 Gigs of 2007

Future Of The Left + Infants @ The Luminaire, London (10 March 2007)

Josh T Pearson @ ATP festival, Minehead (27 April 2007)

Nick Cave / Grinderman @ ATP festival, Minehead (28 April 2007)

Dirty Three @ ATP festival, Minehead (29 April 2007)

Scout Niblett @ Bush Hall, London (21 May 2007)

Isis + Boris @ Koko, London (02 July 2007)

Liars @ Madame Jo Jo’s, London (03 July 2007)

Six Organs Of Admittance @ Paradiso (bovenzaal), Amsterdam (12 August 2007)

Sonic Youth do “Daydream Nation” @ The Roundhouse, London (30 August 2007)

Jesu @ Paradiso (bovenzaal), Amsterdam (05 December 2007)


Correctly guess which picture was taken at which gig and I will send you a copy of my “Best of 2007” 2CD compilation (once I’ve pulled my finger out of my ass and actually made the thing). Use the contact form on the Disclaimer page to submit your ‘entry’.



Compared to the relatively barren (for me) musical months of August and September, October was the veritable muthalode: releases by Om (Floyd-esque pursuit of the transcendental Ur-drone), PJ Harvey (bleak piano-led English Gothic), Qui (the Return of Yow!), and Wooden Shjips (retrotastic distorto-organ-rock) all caught the ear, but it was the newest recordings of two favourite performers that got locked in some winner-takes-all deathmatch before I realised “hey, we’re all winners” and wimped out on the decision by making them both ‘albumi of the month’.


Future of The Left : “Curses” (Too Pure)

It has been exciting following this band from their first London show in September 2006 (this being the first official Future Of The Left show – the previous few were ‘secretly’ performed under aliases: Mooks of Passim, Guerilla Press, Dead Redneck…) through to catching them in 3 different Dutch cities in the past three months as they embarked on the first Future Of The Left tour of Europe. Back in late 2006 they arrived pretty much fully-formed, having obviously spent a lot of time nurturing & perfecting their songs before unleashing them on the public – most of the songs on “Curses” were part of the live set pretty much from the beginning, with only the keyboard stompers first appearing in March. So these songs are like old friends, and far from tiring of their company now that I can spin them whenever I want I am like the proverbial cat (Colin? Chicken?) that got the cream.

Future Of The Left - Curses

Opening with the storming “The Lord Hates A Coward”, the album starts in turbo-charged high gear and only lets the foot off the pedal for the closing Noel Coward-esque “The Contrarian”. This out-of-character last song aside, the album pummels the listener with sledgehammer bass, piston-pounding drums and guitar that could cut through steel. Like Shellac (the band they’re most often compared to), Future Of The Left have a wonderful ability to create dynamic tension in their songs through the removal and re-addition of one of the three instruments, Kelson Mathias’s phat bass and Jack Egglestone’s precision beats often providing the granite foundation to the song before Andy Falkous comes in to spew molten guitar or keyboard riffs and his (mostly uninterpretable) lyrical bile over the proceedings. And despite the words being seemingly mostly meaningless they are strung together in such a literary way that makes ’em unforgetable: you have tall tales of a Devil Thumb, Jack’s pretty pussy, Atlantis rendered badly in oil paints, tiny exo-skeletons and uninteresting ostriches, and get to ponder whether it’s better to be bovine than equine (which I first heard as “better porkfat than eggwhite” and which still made some kinda sense), hedgehog than porcupine, half-cut than borderline…

“Fuck The Countryside Alliance” owes the most to Shellac with its undulating bassline and spare beat, and is also Falco’s most easily decipherable lyric – an anti-Conservative diatribe, a call to arms against the wealthy country gentry, the screams of “take a man to his nightmares in a Landrover” eerily chilling (but funny too: like Killdozer or Shellac, and of course mclusky, FotL’s black sense of humour successfully shines through the music, without ever being a joke that one could tire of).
“Suddenly It’s A Folk Song” will soon be appearing on a double A-side release of punky new wave gloriousness with “Manchasm”, both songs deserving of tearing up the ‘independent’ airwaves (if such a thing still exists) – “Folk Song” in particular is a perfect pop song in the sense that Pixies and Nirvana wrote pop songs, music that can have populous appeal without comprimising the song’s (or the band’s) integrity.
adeadenemyalwayssmellsgood” is one of my favourite songs of the year, moving with a minimalist punkfunk strut that Gang of Four would be proud of and mixing a mammoth riff & Rawhide with arguably the first ever usage of the word “paradiddle” in a song lyric.

I couldn’t help myself wondering though how great these songs would sound recorded over at Electrical Audio, but Falco gave me a fairly compelling reason as to why that is likely to remain a ‘what if?’. And I rudely suggested that the gaps between songs could’ve been a bit longer (so as to allow the listener a momentary breather & to reflect on the gem that had just passed) only to learn that the gaps are the result of hours of intense intra-band debate. I should learn not to question the Mighty Falcotron. Grow into your body happily!!!


Hear live versions of the album’s first three songs at the bottom of this post.



Scout Niblett : “This Fool Can Die Now” (Too Pure

Scout Niblett rocks so damn hard, but can rock so sweetly soft too. It is this wide dynamic – the highs & lows of someone who wears her emotions on her sleeve – helped by the sparseness of the instrumentation (usually just electric guitar, sometimes accompanied by drums), that makes Scout‘s live performances so affecting. New songs like “Nevada”, “Let Thine Heart Be Warmed”, “Do You Want To Be Buried With My People?” and “Kiss” have really captured my imagination over the past twelve months or so, and so (like with Future Of The Left) I couldn’t wait to have the recorded versions in my sweaty stumps, to pore & paw over to my heart’s desire. With Steve Albini charged with capturing it all on tape, and the Bonnie ‘Prince’ hillBilly-ing on four of the songs, it was going to be brilliant.

Scout Niblett - This Fool Can Die Now

So it is disappointing that “This Fool Can Die Now” isn’t quite as huge as I’d hoped it would be. The drums don’t punch hard enough, the guitar doesn’t sear like I know it can, and on some songs Scout’s vocals sound a bit off – like both she and Albini were having a bad day at the office. Don’t get me wrong, I really like this album it just doesn’t knock me over like she does live. Scout is able to hold halls of people transfixed with just her elemental guitar and her soaring voice, but here the added instrumental flourishes (strings, fer chrissakes) and insufficent dynamic range between what should be rapturous volume and ghostly quiet, detract from that raw sound that can suck people right in. Note this as a first: I’ve badmouthed a Steve Albini piece of work! But Scout’s distinctive songs (and the person they spring from) are intact, and Oldham’s presence is a welcome one, still making this one of my favourite albums of the year.

The two opening duets with Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy work well, Oldham comfortably inhabiting the male lover-persona, and “Let Thine Heart Be Warmed” is one of Scout’s standout songs (although here given a strange, incongruous industrial edge as the sound of scraped pipes swings unnecessarily throughout).
The headbanging roadtrip of “Nevada” is my favourite track, like a lovers’ “Fear & Loathing…” and probably the song on this album that comes closest to doing justice to the Scout Niblett live experience.
On “Dinosaur Egg” Scout adds some new verses to the already classic David Shrigley lyrics, personalizing the song further: “Solitude, sweet solitude / When will you disappear? / ‘Cause you’re an acceptable guest sometimes / But you’ll not be a long-term friend of mine“, and the perfectly Scout-ian: “My solar body, oh my solar body / When will I join you out of this flesh? / ‘Cause I am sick & tired of being sick & tired / And I’d much rather be a golden ball of light… but still have sex…

Despite my aforementioned disappointment with “This Fool Can Die Now” I have it on regular rotation in NarcoAgent Towers and am unshakeable in my faith in Scout Niblett as one of modern music’s treasures. This album and 2005’s “Kidnapped By Neptune” both come close to being truly great, but fall short of capturing the awesome Scout-in-the-flesh experience – see her live if she comes to a town near you.  


Here is the opening track of the album: “Do You Want To Be Buried With My People?“, recorded live-in-the-studio in November for The Guardian‘s Music Weekly podcast.


Scout Niblett – Do You Want To Be Buried With My People? (live in session)



Scout Niblett and Future of The Left releases can be obtained directly from Too Pure (http://toopure.bigcartel.com/). Too Pure have also recently launched a Singles Club (http://www.toopure.com/singlesclub/) which should hopefully feature a 7″ of unreleased songs from both Scout and FotL.



I discovered mclusky relatively late, courtesy of the personal recommendation of Shellac (who invited mclusky to play as part of the “Director’s CutATP festival in March 2004). I was immediately hooked on their snarling punkrock sound, the savagely witty lyrics and propulsive rhythms combining into something akin to a funnier, harder, err… Welsh-er Pixies. So it was hugely disappointing to learn of their break-up less than a year later, tensions between guitarist/vocalist Andy “Falco” Falkous and bassist Jon Chapple apparently escalating to a point of no return. However, mclusky’s parting words of “there’ll be more music soon, from all of us” was a comfort (although I knew then that sides would have to be taken: there was something about Chapple that really rubbed me up the wrong way, so it was always going to be Falco’s post-mclusky project that I’d gravitate towards).

Cue forward about 18 months and Falco, mclusky drummer Jack Egglestone and bassist/vocalist Kelson Mathias (ex-Jarcrew) emerge fully-formed as Future Of The Left, playing shows around the UK, the sound mirroring Falco’s new lean, muscular appearance. Having caught their first (I think) London show back in September 2006 and then seeing them several times since, it has been awesome observing this already-great band in both genesis and evolution. Future Of The Left inevitably draw comparisons to Shellac, not because they’re a pale imitation nor are they wannabe’s, but because they have the same immaculate mastery of dynamics, three men in complete control of their instruments, acutely aware that less is more when it comes to punkrock impact, and not afraid to let their collective sense of humour cut through the abrasive sound.

Future Of The Left - live at the Camden Barfly (06-06-2007)

Their most recent performance was at the Camden Barfly on 06 June, in support of Watford punks Gallows and as part of a Xfm “X-posure” showcase hosted by DJ John Kennedy. Following Kennedy’s introduction, they launch without fanfare into the crunching “The Lord Hates A Coward”. The refrain of “violence she solved everything” and the “if you wanna press press us” bravado highlights a key difference between Future Of The Left and mclusky: FOTL are meaner, more vicious, even less likely to suffer fools. And I don’t know what “she’s got a lot of pickled onions / hanging from her thighs” means but it sounds dirty.

Falco, Future Of The Left - live at the Camden Barfly (06-06-2007)The band power through “Plague Of Onces” and “Fingers Become Thumbs” (“And then the tale took a tall turn: the Devil Thumb made a man a slave!”), Kelson’s phat bass sound threatening to tear the Barfly’s crappy PA a new one. Falco then switches to the Roland Juno-60 for “Manchasm”, FOTL sounding infinitely better than a keyboard hair band has any right to (and you thought I wasn’t going to mention the hair…). Falco back on guitar, battle-lines are drawn in “Fuck The Countryside Alliance” (“you take the A-roads / and we’ll have the towns”), its loping bassline recalling Shellac’s “Didn’t We Deserve A Look At You The Way You Really Are.”

Next up is “Small Bones Small Bodies”, once upon a time ‘projected single #2’ but currently benched – hopefully it gets its release soon though, because it’s a propulsive piece of punk funkery entirely deserving of its very own slab of virgin dye-blackened vinyl. Falco returns to the keyboard for “Suddenly It’s A Folk Song”, which is caustic yet catchy, existing in an alternate reality where Punk wanted to get its leg over on New Romanticism rather than kick its head in. (Shouldn’t be long before FOTL joins this illustrious list, which if alphabetised would put them between Flock Of Seagulls and Howard Jones…). New song “How Green Were The Nazis?” was scheduled to make its debut but must’ve got the jitters, so “My Gymnastic Past” follows, its angry bee riff giving way (wave?) to vocal acrobatics from Falco and Kelson while Jack builds the beat to a crescendo.

All too soon ‘it’s the last song’ (that’s for you Jack), and new single, “Adeadenemyalwayssmellsgood”, which starts with the Rawhide-like refrain of “Roll on, roll on, roll on” before the guitars launch in with a kick to the guts and Jack beats seven shades of shit out of his skins. The song switchs effortlessly through several tempo changes, always managing to remain both incredibly hard and funky at the same time. The Barfly is a shitty-sounding room, but Jack’s cavernous pounding beats, Kelson’s knee-in-the-nuts bass and Falco’s razor-sharp riffs overcome any deficiencies in the live mix. Future Of The Left just rock too godamn hard to let anything stand in their way.

Future Of The Left - live at the Camden Barfly (06-06-2007)

The album is sadly too far away (I think Falco said October…).



Setlist: Future Of The Left @ Camden Barfly, London
(06 June 2007)

The Lord Hates A Coward
Plague Of Onces
Fingers Become Thumbs
Manchasm
Fuck The Countryside Alliance
Small Bones Small Bodies
Suddenly It’s A Folk Song
My Gymnastic Past
Adeadenemyalwayssmellsgood



Here are the first three songs of the set, which were broadcast on John Kennedy‘s “X-posure” radio show on Xfm shortly after the gig.


Future Of The Left – The Lord Hates A Coward (live at the Camden Barfly)

Future Of The Left – Plague Of Onces (live at the Camden Barfly)

Future Of The Left – Fingers Become Thumbs (live at the Camden Barfly)



As should be expected from someone whose lyrics can strip paint off a car at forty paces and reduce common or garden idiots to sickly masses of bubbling adipose tissue, Falco displays a mean turn of phrase when it comes to the written word – check out his occasional MySpace blog postings here. More songs at MySpace and at mp3.com (where the band were filmed performing live at The Off Center whilst in Austin, Texas for the SXSW festival).

And here ends what was nothing more than a thinly-veiled commentary of lust and envy directed at Falco’s handsome head of hair…



Last.fm Chart (weekly)

NA Twitter

NarcoAgent Archives